Category Archives: Nootropic Reviews

Tongkat Ali, also known colloquially as “Longjack” is also known by its botanical name Eurycoma Longifolia. It has also earned the title of “Malaysian ginseng.” Like Rhodiola and other “false ginsengs” it is not actually a ginseng plant but is called such because it shares many of the same adaptogenic and nootropic properties as Panax ginseng. Tongkat Ali has

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Sulbutiamine is a synthetic version of thiamine (B-1 Vitamin). Also known as Arcalion, Enerion, Bisibuthiamine, and Youvitan.  Sulbutiamine was initially developed in Japan as a super-charged B-1 vitamin to offset the effects of chronic thiamine deficiency which is more common in Japan than in the West.

The B Vitamins are vital to a healthy nervous system and lack of thiamine (B-1

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When people first learn about smart drugs and nootropics, often one of the first categories of compounds that are mentioned are the racetams and other related cholinergic enhancers. Cholinergics work primarily by up-modulating the production of acetylcholine which is the learning and memory neurotransmitter. Memory is a vital part of success. Regardless of what jobs or tasks you’re attempting improved

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Centrophenoxine is a nootropic in the cholinergic class. It is related to DMAE but if DMAE were plain, old, ordinary choline bitartrate, centrophenoxine is like Alpha GPC. It is considered memory boosting as well as having some stimulatory and mood boosting effects along with the cognitive enhancement benefits. Just what is centrophenoxine a cholinergic? Technically it’s one of the first

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Mucuna pruriens is the Velvet bean. Also known as cowage or cow-itch due to the fact that it’s spines can cause irritation to a cows mouth. Due to the high amount of serotonin and dopamine precursors, the cows generally just keep on chewing. Velvet bean has some studies backing it up as an effective adjunct against Parkinson’s disease and for

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Rhodiola Rosea is considered a natural nootropic. It is also classed as an adaptogen. Adaptogens can help the body and brain deal with environmental and internal stressors as well as working to tone the adrenal system which can result in lessened fatigue, improved  mood, less anxiety and more jitter-free energy. Anecdotally there is a wealth of evidence that Rhodiola is

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You are what you eat, is a very old saying, but in the case of the brain what it is made of and the quality of what you eat are very closely tied. The brain is the body’s control center and as such is one of the most energy demanding of all organs and systems. The gray matter in the

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Uridine is classified as a pseudovitamin and nootropic that stacks well with choline or fish oil, (especially DHA) for improved cognition. Uridine is also used as a substrate from which cytidine is synthesized. Cytidine is related to cytidisine phosphocoline (citicoline or CDP choline).

Supplementation of uridine seems to be in the 500-1,000mg range, with the lone human study using the higher

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One of the most well known and loved of all the classes and categories of nootropics is of course the racetam family of cholinergics. This is at least in part due to the fact that the racetams (especially the three classic racetams, piracetam, aniracetam and oxiracetam) are some of the safest and most widely studied of all the true nootropics.

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The amino acid l-theanine is one of the most versatile of all the naturally sourced nootropics. Sourced from Camellia sinensis (tea leaves) it is most apparent in green tea. L-theanine is also present in much smaller doses in black tea and can also be found in guayusa. L-theanine is considered calming but is not actually sedative. L-theanine is not an

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